My sentences are long, with no end and no beginning. My jokes are corny. I eat ice cream out of a tub and love left-over pizza. I mix vodka and tequila even though I know better. My hair is always a mess, and there is always smudged mascara somewhere on my face. All of my white shirts have stains. I can’t walk in heels, but I wear them anyway. I have strong opinions. I am passionate. I am stubborn. My will doesn’t bend easily. I am indecisive and a little bit lost. I seek comfort in books - I don’t trust people, I like music more than I like to talk. I have good days and bad days, and stay-all-day-in-bed days. I have dreams, and hopes and problems. I am chaos. I am a person. I am not a love interest. I am not a poorly written character your character helps define. I am not a line in a poem - I am the poet. I do not strive to be liked, I want to be loved. And if you can’t love me with my flaws you don’t deserve my love, for it too - is flawed.

m.v., It wasn’t me, it was you.  (via findingwordsforthoughts)
xgymchick:

:) on We Heart Ithttp://weheartit.com/entry/105831367/via/patty2l

In Britain, make-up might have been hard to find, but it was worn with pride and became a symbol of the will to win. ‘Put your best face forward,’ encouraged a 1942 Yadley advertisement in Churchillian tones. ‘War, Woman and Lipstick' ran a celebrated Tangee campaign. Bright red was the favourite wartime colur for lips and nails and lipstick names were often patriotic: Louis Phillippe's Patriotic Red; Fighting Red by Tussy and Grenadier - The new Military red created by Tattoo, effective with air force blue and khaki.

During wartime, a subtle change had taken place in the marketing and the perception of make-up. It was no longer about making a woman seem ‘dainty’, but making her look and feel strong. Rosie the Riveter became a wartime icon in the USA, representing the six million women working in factories for the war effort. [Rockwell] portrayed Rosie as a vast figure in work dungarees, her short sleeves revealing arms the size of prize-winning hams. Behind her hangs the stars and stripes, squashed carelessly under her feet is a copy of Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf, and on her mighty lap rests a lunch box and a huge riveting machine like an enormous gun. [Her] henna red curls, lipsticked mouth and painted finger nails stress her femininity, emphasising the fact that make-up too was a weapon of war [Madeleine Marsh, Compact and Cosmetics: Beauty from the Victorian Times to the Present Day]

(Source: reyesrobbies, via hermionegrangerandarocketship)